Lord Randall barreled inside, brandishing his cane in Drew's face.You beggarly knave, I was told this marriage was in name only! Who gave you permission to consummate the vows?Theodore Hopkin, governor of this colony, representative of the kind and it's going to cost you plenty, for that daughter of yours is nothing but trouble. What in the blazes were you thinking to allow her an education?Drew bit back his smile at the man's shocked expression. Nothing like landing the first punch.Lord Randall furrowed his bushy gray brows.I knew not about her education until it was too late.Drew straightened the cuffs of his shirt. Well, be prepared to pay dearly for it. No man should have to suffer through what I do with the constant spouting of the most addlepated word puzzles you could imagine.-----------------------------------------I require fifteen thousand pounds.Lord Randall spewed ale across the floor. What! Surely drink has tickled your poor brain. You're a FARMER, you impudent rascal. I'll give you five thousand.Drew plopped his drink onto the table at his side, its contents sloshing over the rim. A satisfied smile broke across his face.Excellent. He stood.When will you take her back to England with you? Today? Tomorrow?The old man's red-rimmed eyes widened. I cannot take her back. Why, she's already birthed a child! Drew shrugged. Fifteen thousand or I send her AND the babe back, with or without you.
Deeanne Gist
. . . waves of desert heat . . . I must’ve passed out, because when I woke up I was shivering and stars wheeled above a purple horizon. . . . Then the sun came up, casting long shadows. . . . I heard a vehicle coming. Something coming from far away, gradually growing louder. There was the sound of an engine, rocks under tires. . . . Finally it reached me, the door opened and Dirk Bickle stepped out. . . .But anyway so Bickle said, Miracles, Luke. Miracles were once the means to convince people to abandon reason for faith. But the miracles stopped during the rise of the neocortex and its industrial revolution. Tell me, if I could show you one miracle, would you come with me and join Mr. Kirkpatrick?I passed out again and came to. He was still crouching beside me. He stood up, walked over to the battered refrigerator and opened the door. Vapor poured out and I saw it was stocked with food. Bickle hunted around a bit, found something wrapped in paper and took a bottle of beer from the door. Then he closed the fridge, sat down on the old tire and unwrapped what looked like a turkey sandwich.He said, You could explain the fridge a few ways. One, there’s some hidden outlet, probably buried in the sand, that leads to a power source far away. I figure there’d have to be at least twenty miles of cable involved before it connected to the grid. That’s a lot of extension cord. Or, this fridge has some kind of secret battery system. If the empirical details didn’t bear this out, if you thoroughly studied the refrigerator and found neither a connection to a distant power source nor a battery, you might still argue that the fridge had some super-insulation capabilities and that the food inside had been able to stay cold since it was dragged out here. But say this explanation didn’t pan out either and you observed the fridge staying the same temperature week after week while you opened and closed it. Then you’d start to wonder if it was powered by some technology beyond your comprehension. But pretty soon you’d notice something else about this refrigerator. The fact that it never runs out of food. Then you’d start to wonder if somehow it didn’t get restocked while you slept. But you’d realize that it replenished itself all the time, not just while you were sleeping. All this time, you’d keep eating from it. It would keep you alive out here in the middle of nowhere. And because of its mystery you’d begin to hate and fear it and yet still it would feed you. Even though you couldn’t explain it, you’d still need it. And you’d assume that you simply didn’t understand the technology, rather than ascribe to it some kind of metaphysical power. You wouldn’t place your faith in the hands of some unknowable god. You’d place it in the technology itself. Finally, in frustration, you’d come to realize you’d exhausted your rationality and the only sensible thing to do would be to praise the mystery. You’d worship its bottles of Corona and jars of pickled beets. You’d make up prayers to the meats drawer and sing about its light bulb. And you’d start to accept the mystery as the one undeniable thing about it. That, or you’d grow so frustrated you’d push it off this cliff.Is Mr. Kirkpatrick real? I asked.After a long gulp of beer, Bickle said, That’s the neocortex talking again.
Ryan Boudinot