God told us to love everyone. However, when you don’t like someone then you need to walk away and focus not on him or her, but the hatred you’re harboring. Otherwise, you will allow your piety to take over. Before you know it, you’re using the gospel as a sword to slice other religious people apart, which have offended you. From your point of helplessness, it will be is easy to recruit people that will mistake your kindness as righteousness, when in reality it is a hidden agenda to humiliate through the words of Christ. This game is so often used by women in the Christian faith, that it is the number one reason why many people become inactive. It is a silent, unspoken hypocrisy that is inconsistent with the teachings of the gospel. If you choose not to like someone, then avoid them. If you wish to love them, the only way to overcome your frustrations is through empathy, prayer, forgiveness and allowing yourself time to heal through distance. Try focusing on what you share as sisters in the gospel, rather than the negative aspects you dislike about that person.
Shannon L. Alder
I guess that sometimes it just takes a long walk through the darkness, a long walk through the darkest shadows and corners of your soul to realize that those are a part of you as well, that you've created through your experiences and thoughts those parts within yourself and as much as you can choose to fear them and repress them, they will require your attention one day, they will need your care and acceptance before you can clean them away and turn the lights on. For you refuse to shine the light on something that is imperfect, because you fear judgement and rejection, but you can always choose to look towards the light as the only source of true beauty and love that can help you in the cleaning process. Healing, after a long time of struggle and mess is a complex process, but a necessary one nevertheless. We are so overwhelmed by the amount of work it requires that we so often choose to run away from the light, hide in our dark corner and hope that we will never be found, hope that we will never be seen, or desperately look outwards for that love and compassion that we can no longer find within ourselves, for our soul's light no longer shines as it used to. And sometimes we just find those people that can see the light beneath all that dust and darkness that's been pilled up, those kind of light workers that understand our broken souls and manage to pick us up and see the beauty within us, when we find it so hard to see it ourselves. Sometimes I get so tired of separation, of division, of groups and different religions and belief systems. Even if you do find the truth, once you've put it into words, books and rules it already becomes distorted by the mind into something that is no longer truth. So I no longer hope for understanding, no longer hope for the opinion of a judgemental mind, but I hope to find the words that touch the soul before the mind, I hope to find the touch that warms the heart from deep inside and hope to find that far away abandoned part of me which I've left behind.
Virgil Kalyana Mittata Iordache
The differences between religions are reflected very clearly in the different forms of sacred art: compared with Gothic art, above all in its flamboyant style, Islamic art is contemplative rather than volitive: it is intellectual and not dramatic and it opposes the cold beauty of geometrical design to the mystical heroism of cathedrals. Islam is the perspective of omnipresence (God is everywhere), which coincides with that of simultaneity (Truth has always been); it aims at avoiding any particularization or condensation, any unique fact in time and space, although as a religion it necessarily includes an aspect of unique fact, without which it would be ineffective or even absurd. In other words Islam aims at what is everywhere center and this is why, symbolically speaking, it replaces the cross with the cube or the woven fabric: it decentralizes and universalizes to the greatest possible extent, in the realm of art as in that of doctrine; it is opposed to any individualist mode and hence to any personalist mysticism. To express ourselves in geometrical terms, we could say that a point which seeks to be unique and which thus becomes an absolute center, appears to Islam—in art as in theology—as a usurpation of the divine absoluteness and therefore as an association (shirk); there is only one single center, God, whence the prohibition against centralizing images, especially statues; even the Prophet, the human center of the tradition, has no right to a Christic uniqueness and is decentralized by the series of other Prophets; the same is true of Islam—or the Koran—which is similarly integrated in a universal fabric and a cosmic rhythm, having been preceded by other religions—or other Books—which it merely restores. The Kaaba, center of the Muslim world, becomes space as soon as one is inside the building: the ritual direction of prayer is then projected toward the four cardinal points.If Christianity is like a central fire, Islam on the contrary resembles a blanket of snow, at once unifying and leveling and having its center everywhere.
Frithjof Schuon